“Baby goats!” was all I could muster…

It was no April Fool’s  joke when I walked down to feed the goats around 7am last Friday, and saw four new little legs in the goat shelter. It could only mean one thing….

BABY GOATS!

I felt like it was a fire drill, but this was the real deal!

The first baby was up on his feet, looking strong.12928173_10153365339322121_4482068847831508285_n

Peeking around the corner, I saw another caramel colored guy laying on the ground, looking limp and pushed to the side.  Once I saw them both and my mind began processing what was in front of me, my awe-struck words poured out.

I whispered softly at first…

“Baby goats…”

and with increasing enthusiasm squealed…

“baby goats, BABY GOATS!”

With this, I took off running up the hill to the farmhouse as fast as I could, arms flailing. Quickly I scanned my memory for what to do next, trying to mentally sort through the oodles and oodles of information we had gathered for months from both books and the internet. I dialed my partner Adam’s phone, who had left for work just minutes before.

No answer.  So, the next best thing….I texted.  And can you guess what I texted?

BABY GOATS!

It seems that was the only phrase I could muster.

When I arrived to the house, legs shaking and lungs working hard, my roommate Pat was already up at the stove and eggs were sizzling in the cast-iron pan.12916307_10153365338432121_9068965782176276888_o

“Baby goats!” I exclaimed.

Pat, being the very helpful friend, helped me grab the bucket of goat baby supplies we had prepared, and ran down to the pen.

When we arrived back down there, it hit me.

Gidget had done this all on her own, without our assistance at all.  She had managed this amazing feat in the early morning hours, and the babies came out fine; both were dry already, and the caramel baby was stirring a bit. I became teary eyed looking down at the furry four-legged family that was bonding before my very eyes.

I scooped the brown baby up to check him out, all the while softly telling Gidget what a good job she had done.  The black one was already at mom, trying to nurse by poking his his mouth at Gidget’s underside trying to find a teat. As we had learned from  our trusty “goat books”  (Storey’s Guide to Raising Dairy Goats and City Goats proved to be our favorites), the cords need to be cleaned quickly to prevent infection, so I dipped them carefully in iodine we had poured into a film canister.

After the dip, I gently set them down in the soft straw of the shelter stood up, looked at Pat and smiled.  We did it!

Adam was able to drop by a few minutes later to check out the new babies before heading back to work.   Together we had planner, prepared, researched, and anticipated this moment, and it was humbling to see the incredible knowledge of nature and instinct at work.  Gidget is a really attentive and sweet mother.

With two babies born already without our help four short days ago, we are focusing our attentions on Mickey, the other pregnant doe. We are here to assist in the kidding (goats giving birth) if needed, but the goats are really teaching us how it is done.

How fun to see something happen that you have planned for for so long.  This really is a dream come true for both of us, and we look forward to raising the baby goats, and eventually making soap, cheese and salted caramels! Delicious!

Happy Tuesday, folks!

 

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16 Comments Add yours

  1. Cezane says:

    Beautiful piece! I love how your blog is so differently set out. It is one of the stand outs from many that i have come across, Instant follower of you now, cheers! 🙂

  2. Many congratulations!! They are sooo adorable and cute! And what a lovely picture of the mother goat kissing her baby! So sweet! 😀

    1. missyjean says:

      Thank you so, so much. We are over the moon thrilled….you would not believe how soft those babies are and how sweetly they interact with mom!

      1. I can only imagine! 🙂 Please give them a cuddle and a kiss from me! Wish you a lovely time 😀

  3. DairyGoatDiaries says:

    I’ve seen baby goats a million times and I react just like you every time! They’re so magical.

    1. missyjean says:

      Indeed! Glad to hear it does not get old, because it was simply so amazing to witness. Thanks for following along 🙂

    1. missyjean says:

      They are really cute and BIG now! I need to do an update post.

      Although I post sketching stuff here mostly, the other part of my time is spent doing goat chores or processing milk. It is so very rewarding, but a lot of work. 🙂 I always appreciate your comments 🙂

      1. wow that must hard work , but I am sure it pays on in the end … I like farm animals but never have worked with them for extended periods .

      2. missyjean says:

        They are pretty fun, and I am amazed at how much personality each goat has.

        The payment is a fridge full of milk, yogurt, and now farm cheese! It is satisfying, and actually the early mornings when everything is quiet and fresh is a pretty wonderful way to ease into the day.

      3. Beautiful , I can only imagine that now , in my childhood my grandparents had farm animals , not a large one though but ..I still remember that fresh and quiet mornings ..

  4. Rebekah says:

    How exciting!! We just finished the fencing and building to bring goats onto our little homestead. We will be starting with two baby girls in October! Your pictures get me excited all over again! Baby Nubians are so adorable with those long ears.

    1. missyjean says:

      They are so cute….those ears really fly when they all run together in a herd.

      So awesome about your homestead! Goats have been so rewarding, and I wouldn’t change a thing. Keep me posted on your new endeavor!

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